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Chanakya Story Of Indian teacher | philosopher and royal adviser

Chanakya (370–283 BCE) was an Indian teacher, philosopher and royal adviser.
Originally a professor of economics and political science at the ancient Takshashila University, Chanakya managed the first Maurya emperor Chandragupta’s rise to power at a young age.

He is widely credited for having played an important role in the establishment of the Maurya Empire, which was the first empire in archaeologically recorded history to rule most of the Indian subcontinent. Chanakya served as the chief advisor to both Chandragupta and his son Bindusara.

Chanakya is traditionally identified as Kautilya or Vishnu Gupta, who authored the ancient Indian political treatise called Arthaśāstra. As such, he is considered as the pioneer of the field of economics and political science in India, and his work is thought of as an important precursor to Classical Economics.

Chanakya is often called the “Indian Machiavelli”, although his works predate Machiavelli’s by about 1,800 years.His works were lost near the end of the Gupta dynasty and not rediscovered until 1915.

Chanakya’s birthplace is a matter of controversy, and there are multiple theories about his origin.
According to one theory, he was born in Pataliputra or a town near it, Kusumpur. According to the Buddhist text Mahavamsa Tika, his birthplace was Taxila. The Jain scriptures, such as Adbidhana Chintamani, mention him as a Dramila, implying that he was a native of South India.

According to some other Jain accounts such as Hemachandra’s  Parishishtaparva, Chanakya was born in the Canaka village of the Golla region, to a Jain Brahmin named Canin and his wife Canesvari. Other sources mention his father’s name as Chanak and state that Chanakaya’s name derives from his father’s name.

Chanakaya Most Famous Quotes Given Bellow

“As soon as the fear approaches near, attack and destroy it.”

 

“There is no disease so destructive as lust.”

 

“Before you start some work, always ask yourself three questions – Why am I doing it, What the results might be and Will I be successful. Only when you think deeply and find satisfactory answers to these questions, go ahead.”

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